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optrion-three How would you like to get so many referrals that they're your number one source of inbound leads? You potentially could—if you’re willing to to take an honest assessment of your approach to service models. If you’re like many other advisors, you probably segment your clients according to profitability. Then you create a different service model for each segment. The most profitable clients—call them level "A"—get face-to-face quarterly meetings, nice leather-bound financial plans, maybe some football tickets. The B-level clients get vinyl, not real leather, and they can’t sit in the skybox. And down it goes. It’s a very typical model (and yes, I'm exaggerating to prove a point). But I have a problem with it. Here’s where things get awkward. If I found out I was a "D" client, why wouldn’t I leave and go someplace where I could be an "A" client? If your book is really segmented "A" through "D," that means you are intentionally giving suboptimal service to 75% of your clients. In an industry that lives and breathes referrals, how is that supposed to help you grow?

image1 If you sell to advisors, you’ve probably experienced at least one deal that seemed like a sure thing—but you just couldn’t make it happen. You hit it off with the advisor. He or she seemed to really get your message. But the sale just petered out, leaving you to wonder why. On the other hand, maybe you had a client relationship that inexplicably soured. You lost the account without ever understanding what happened.

time-01 (Note: In this post, I’m speaking directly to all the marketing coordinators, marketing directors and marketing managers ensconced at their lonely posts inside advisor firms. This one’s for you—but it might do some good if your boss reads it, too.) "What have you done for me lately?" If you haven’t heard your boss say that yet, you probably will—and sooner than you think. You were hired with high expectations. You see, your boss thinks that, as soon as you arrived, all of your firm’s marketing challenges would be instantly solved. You’re supposed to be a one-person band, able to edit a podcast with Audacity while writing a prospecting letter with your other hand and laying out a brochure with InDesign while coding a website with your toes. This is how you’ll be able to triple revenue in six months, right? Right? Time for a reality check. Look, I love and respect financial advisors. I spent the first decade of my career on the inside working directly with advisory firm owners, and co-founded this company because of my genuine passion for the profession and the industry. But I have to be honest about my experience and what I've learned over the years. Most advisor's expectations of what a single marketing person can do are just not realistic. And there’s only one solution.

jrh5laq-mis-william-iven Sometimes, participating in an RFP process is like eavesdropping on an awkward first date. You can tell everybody is trying to say the right thing, but nobody really understands what the other person is talking about. Here are a few questions to incorporate into your conversations with vendors, so you can better understand what you’re buying before you sign a contract: