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[vc_row el_class="post-content"][vc_column][outlined-text outlined_text="The No. 1" outlined_text_color="white" outline_color="black" normal_text="Mistake" normal_text_color="black" heading_tag="h1" extra_class="post-heading"][vc_column_text el_class="post-subheading"]

Vendors Make About “Cool Factor”

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text][get-user-data][/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class="post-body"]Like most people with a social media account, my feed is oversaturated with random acts of content – written pieces without any strategy or value – and so I’ve become very selective about what I allow onto my reading list. There was one headline, however, that I think is worth discussing: Is Indianapolis Cool Enough for Amazon?This piece in the New York Times defends the Midwestern city as a headquarters choice for the media and distribution giant. As someone that works in content, this immediately spoke to me because the word “cool” has layers of meaning. Cool factor can mean how Instagram-worthy something is, or how much it appeals to the Millenial audience (both major issues in current-day marketing). But in this case, I took this article as Indianapolis’ attempt at a rebrand of the city. They are trying to change public perception.

[vc_row el_class="post-content"][vc_column][outlined-text outlined_text="Say the" outlined_text_color="white" outline_color="black" normal_text="Right Thing:" normal_text_color="black" heading_tag="h1" extra_class="post-heading"][vc_column_text el_class="post-subheading"]

A Podcast on Mastering PR & Marketing

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text][get-user-data][/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class="post-body"]For a job that inherently deals with constant change, from fluctuating markets to the unpredictable life events, the role of a financial advisor is one that is often steeped in tradition. Tradition is outdated. As in nearly all other aspects of life, technology has changed the way that clients and potential leads interact with businesses. While many financial advisors have built their business on networking within established social circles, or through client referrals, that type of organic growth is swiftly falling by the wayside of taxi cabs and payphones: it’s becoming archaic. Before you counter with, “But that rapport is why my clients have stuck around for 35 years!” I want to make clear that relationships are still very much central to being a successful advisor. But it is much more common for a prospect to have Googled you and taken a deep look at your website before ever requesting that first meeting. The prospect is in control of the initial relationship, and many advisors are having difficulty adjusting. That’s where PR and marketing come in.

[vc_row el_class="post-content"][vc_column][outlined-text outlined_text="It’s Time" outlined_text_color="white" outline_color="black" normal_text="to Get Ready" normal_text_color="black" heading_tag="h1" extra_class="post-heading"][vc_column_text el_class="post-subheading"]

For Your Annual Marketing Planning. First, Break Everything.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text][get-user-data][/vc_column_text][vc_column_text el_class="post-body"]The year is almost over. That means it’s time to write your annual marketing plan. (You do have a plan, right? I hope you aren’t spending money without one!) The next few posts are going to show you how to create a plan that gets results—and have fun doing it. Let’s face it. Most of the time, an annual planning meeting is kind of a downer. It starts by looking backward. What did we achieve against our business plan? Where did we fail? What worked, what didn’t? Obviously, no firm reaches 100% of its goals, so there are bound to be some disappointments. That’s why this part of the process usually feels about as much fun as weighing yourself.